have an eyefull
vinylround:

vinylkittie:

don’t take me to the flea market i’ll buy all the good records and leave you with nothing

http://www.vinylround.com/top-5-places-buy-vinyl-records/

vinylround:

vinylkittie:

don’t take me to the flea market i’ll buy all the good records and leave you with nothing

http://www.vinylround.com/top-5-places-buy-vinyl-records/

beesandbombs:

sliding squares

beesandbombs:

sliding squares

vigorton2:

MOURNING REIGN - Satisfaction Guaranteed (1966)

Classic snotty gargepunk from San Jose, California.

Vinyl rip from: THE FINEST HOURS OF U.S. 60’s PUNK (Eva 12039)

curioos-arts:

Ruben Córdoba Schwaneberg (Spain) - Portfolio

curioos-arts:

Ruben Córdoba Schwaneberg (Spain) - Portfolio

(via marinaesque)

(via marinaesque)

marinaesque:

Platon Celebrity Portraits

marinaesque:

Platon Celebrity Portraits

curioos-arts:

Felipe Vargas (Chile)

curioos-arts:

Felipe Vargas (Chile)

moregeekthangeek:

via 1.bp.blogspot.com

moregeekthangeek:

via 1.bp.blogspot.com

moregeekthangeek:

fuckyeahsciencefiction:

fuckyeahmovieposters:

12 Monkeys

moregeekthangeek:

fuckyeahsciencefiction:

fuckyeahmovieposters:

12 Monkeys

designaemporter:

IFC Branding from Ryan Moore on Vimeo.

sizvideos:

Video

reblog-gif:

Tumblr best Funny Gif Blog — http://gifini.com/

reblog-gif:

Tumblr best Funny Gif Blog — http://gifini.com/


There are photos of the Beatles and family on every wall of the downstairs corridor and kitchen: there’s George, Paul, Ringo and John, some poses from the Hamburg years; Stella McCartney hangs by the spiral staircase. As I walk in, my eyes barely register them, these most famous of men almost as familiar as my own relatives, but then I get a jolt: these aren’t the posters of any ordinary fan, they’re the family photographs of Olivia Harrison and her son Dhani, just remembering husband and dad, now he’s gone. 
It’s the same kind of jolt Olivia gets when she listens to Harrison’s voice, now that his first six solo albums have been digitally remastered in a box set, The Apple Years. When I put on the first song of the set it’s so clear that the first words, “Let me in here”, are like Harrison whispering into my ear 13 years after his death. The effect isn’t ghostly, it’s real.
"I know," says Olivia, with her forceful Californian lilt, now that we’re upstairs in the more formal sitting room of her Knightsbridge townhouse. "It’s got the breath in it, hasn’t it? He had the most distinctive voice, those funny little vowels. I always have that disconnect where I’m listening as a music lover and then I suddenly go, ‘Oh, oh, it’s you.’"
Her deep brown eyes - so similar to his - drift to the middle distance and there’s a beat of silence. That recognition is “not painful”. Occasionally she finds herself listening to a song and it does not conjure him up just as he played it to her. “When that happens it doesn’t make me happy,” she laughs. She wants their connection to live whenever she hears his music. “Oh, wait, don’t ever let that become just objective, something that you don’t connect to.”
[…] The Scorsese documentary, instigated by Olivia, opens with Dhani being asked what he would say to his father if he appeared now. Dhani says he saw his father in a dream and asked him “Where’ve you been?” and his father replied, “Here the whole time.”
"What Dhani said was really very lovely. He had a lot of numinous dreams." She smiles and repeats, "Here the whole time." I ask Olivia what she would say to George now. She pauses.
"I hope I told you everything. I hope I told you how wonderful you are."
- The Sunday Times (24 September 2014)
[credit to friarparksoulclub for sending this article to me :)]

There are photos of the Beatles and family on every wall of the downstairs corridor and kitchen: there’s George, Paul, Ringo and John, some poses from the Hamburg years; Stella McCartney hangs by the spiral staircase. As I walk in, my eyes barely register them, these most famous of men almost as familiar as my own relatives, but then I get a jolt: these aren’t the posters of any ordinary fan, they’re the family photographs of Olivia Harrison and her son Dhani, just remembering husband and dad, now he’s gone. 

It’s the same kind of jolt Olivia gets when she listens to Harrison’s voice, now that his first six solo albums have been digitally remastered in a box set, The Apple Years. When I put on the first song of the set it’s so clear that the first words, “Let me in here”, are like Harrison whispering into my ear 13 years after his death. The effect isn’t ghostly, it’s real.

"I know," says Olivia, with her forceful Californian lilt, now that we’re upstairs in the more formal sitting room of her Knightsbridge townhouse. "It’s got the breath in it, hasn’t it? He had the most distinctive voice, those funny little vowels. I always have that disconnect where I’m listening as a music lover and then I suddenly go, ‘Oh, oh, it’s you.’"

Her deep brown eyes - so similar to his - drift to the middle distance and there’s a beat of silence. That recognition is “not painful”. Occasionally she finds herself listening to a song and it does not conjure him up just as he played it to her. “When that happens it doesn’t make me happy,” she laughs. She wants their connection to live whenever she hears his music. “Oh, wait, don’t ever let that become just objective, something that you don’t connect to.”

[…] The Scorsese documentary, instigated by Olivia, opens with Dhani being asked what he would say to his father if he appeared now. Dhani says he saw his father in a dream and asked him “Where’ve you been?” and his father replied, “Here the whole time.”

"What Dhani said was really very lovely. He had a lot of numinous dreams." She smiles and repeats, "Here the whole time." I ask Olivia what she would say to George now. She pauses.

"I hope I told you everything. I hope I told you how wonderful you are."

- The Sunday Times (24 September 2014)

[credit to friarparksoulclub for sending this article to me :)]

qualcomm:

Three decades ago, if you brought together every mobile phone subscriber in the entire world, you would barely have enough people to fill up Qualcomm Stadium.

Since then, inventions have changed the world.

Today, there are over 7 billion active mobile devices in existence. In its relatively short time here on Earth, the mobile device has, and continues to, transform our lives. Drawing from World Bank data, we visualized the rise of invention in mobile phone technology.

Read More